wove in 14 pictures

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It starts with just 2 skeins of sock yarn.

(75% sw Merino\ 25% nylon – not necessarily important, but something somewhat strong works best, because the warp is under the most stress)

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Direct warp on a 15″ rigid heddle loom.

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Weft yarn same as warp.

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Heddle up shuttle to the left, beat, heddle down shuttle to the right, beat, repeat.

(I keep my up = left & down = right consistent, that way I never undo what I just did :)

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Miles and miles of tidy edge plain tabby weaving. The trick to straight selvages, stay obsessed with weft tension.

(This can be tricky with sock yarn, that dang nylon not only adds strength, but also adds stretch, bounce and recoil, if you pull it too taunt, it can suck in and pucker the edge.
I also don’t over beat between passes, just a light kiss, leaving a little more open weave now will result it a more supple scarf later, it will pull in on itself (recoil) once it’s cut off the loom. Alternatively over beat if you want something more dense/stiff in the end.)

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Hemstitched. (4×3)

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Hot soapy soak and a little friction, to aid in the bloom. (rosewood scent)

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Blocked flat, trimmed fringe.

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A smidge longer than my usual 100″ and a bit mellower than I expected.
..completely in love..

πŸ’•

26 thoughts on “wove in 14 pictures

  1. This is very lovely. You have done an expert job with the construction. The drape and tension consistency are obvious. I had not realized the diversity of your technical skills to realize your creative artistic nature. KUDOS!

    1. Thank you for your kind words πŸ’•sometimes I get lost in the little details and forget to loosen up about the whole process. But I appreciate you noticing my effort!

  2. Just beautiful! I actually got my loom out the other day after seeing inspiring weaving pics and now I want to make a plain scarf, inspired by yours! Fab edges by the way!

    S x

  3. dear amanda chalklegs,

    1. do you “double-warp” your edges in order to achieve such fine-looking edges?

    2. image # 8 (“Hemstitched. (4Γ—3)”) is awesome ! – SO visually instructive !

    3. i love Anonymous’ comment “Truly lovely and fascination.”
    it don’t get much better than that, comment-wise

    yours, mimi

  4. Hi Mimi πŸ’•

    #1 I don’t double warp my edges ..I didn’t even know that was a thing, that’s interesting!

    #2 I’m so happy you found the photos helpful, hemstitching is a beautiful and magical beginning and ending to weaving :)

    #3 Agreed! Although I truly appreciate every comment, it means so much to me that people take time out of their day to read & dropped me a note! Thank you πŸ˜™

  5. Amanda –

    1. Having had problems with flabby edges on plain-weave scarves, I “kinda” learned (I don’t actually remember where or how!) about putting two ends instead of just one in the one or two edge heddles, to firm up the edges. Haven’t tried it yet, though. I’m super impressed that your edges look so neat…

    3. I think we have Autocorrect to thank for that agrammatical “fascination”. I heart opportunistic agrammaticality!

    3. I read and [occasionally] drop notes over coffee every morning, here in my mellow little life in NoCal. It’s a thing. For me.

    Have a great day!

    mimi

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